Wires

Wires

It was such an easy fix. It would have cost maybe twenty-dollars. Instead, the boss had insisted that the smoke was just “burn-off.” “Nothing to worry about,” his boss said. When they finally pried his still living hand from his dead skin, all he could think about was the little bit of money his boss saved in exchange for his livelihood.

Words by Cynthia M. Gayton

What-a ya do-in

What-a ya do-in

“Seriously? Just because I let you feed me doesn’t mean I should suffer such indignity! At least let me put on a tie!

Words by Cynthia M. Gayton

Lip stick

Lip stick

“It’s such a burden,” Judy said. “To be so ridiculously beautiful.” She tossed her straw-like hair over her shoulder and gave the photographer her most honest smile. The photographer told her to pout. “Pout?” She said. “I don’t do ‘pout’.” She re-arranged her pose, “How’s this?” She said speaking through tightly closed lips stretched into a wane smile.

Words by Cynthia M. Gaytonarti

Ice / Rock

Ice / Rock

This was it, Gerri’s final semester. She had hiked some of the Appalachian Trail and decided to stop in Harpers Ferry in late November. No particular reason. Maybe she had made her point. Maybe she could trust herself again.

Words by Cynthia M. Gayton

The open road

The open road

He opened his eyes and saw that they had just entered the state of North Carolina. He turned to look at his sister. She was hunched over the wheel, her knuckles white. They started to swerve into the left lane. He shouted, “What are you doing?” and grabbed the wheel. “I’ve got it, I’ve got it,” she said quietly as tears continued to stream down her face.

Words by Cynthia M. Gayton

Image

Feel the wind on his face

Feel the wind on his face